Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?
December 18, 2017, 03:50 am

Updated Topics | Recent Unread Topics
Home Help Search Login Register

+  Dragon Mountain
|-+  Forum
| |-+  Food
| | |-+  Simple fool-proof batter?
Pages: [1] 2 Print
Author Topic: Simple fool-proof batter?  (Read 11818 times)
Wibblewobble
Pug Club President


May contain nuts


View Profile
« on: May 17, 2010, 03:39 pm »

Help me Obi DragonMountain, you are my only hope.

First off, I can make a kickarse batter for pancakes or Yorkshire Pudding.

BUT, I am hopeless at making batter for things like prawns and fish, you know, stuff you deep-fry for just a minute or two.

It always ends up as Prawn-In-Slighty-Floury-Fried-Egg.

Has anyone got an idiot-proof easy batter (they've actually made for themselves) for that kind of thing?
Logged

The Iron Colonel
Nevermind, Just Another Jerk



View Profile
« Reply #1 on: May 17, 2010, 04:02 pm »

It depends on exactly what you're cooking. Do you want "breaded" stuff or battered stuff? The former can be done easily with panko, although the technique doesn't really change. The former is pretty straightforward using egg/flour. Suppose that you're making schnitzel; you'd pound out your pork nice and flat, then pat it dry with a paper towel. Patting the meat dry is important - you don't want the surface all wet and gross, but dry and tacky (drying the meat is crucial - just do it). Then dredge the meat in flour. Depending on how "bready" you want your food, you can then dredge in egg and again in flour to get a nice thick coat (make sure to shake off any excess flour or panko). The seasoning can be whatever you prefer, but you'll want to season before you put any flour on the meat.

As simple as that sounds, that's it. I do this fairly frequently and it always comes out just fine. Another consideration is how much oil you're using and how hot it is. Oil  that is too cool will just make your coating into sludge, and too  hot will burn the coating. You can test the temperature with a thermometer, but I prefer to simply drop a little breading (egg/flour mix) into the oil and see how it fries. You also need to ensure that you're using enough oil; too little, and you won't evenly cook the meat. For large flat-ish stuff I try to get the meat at least 2/3 submerged.
Logged
Wibblewobble
Pug Club President


May contain nuts


View Profile
« Reply #2 on: May 17, 2010, 04:09 pm »

Nah, thanks for that, but I have problems with the sort of light, crispy batter that you cook for seconds.

You know, a bit like tempura, except that I've never had any success making tempura from on-line recipes.
Logged

norumaru
Columns: 2, Pillars: 4,
Posts: 5



View Profile
« Reply #3 on: May 17, 2010, 04:37 pm »

I don't really know what is so difficult about tempura, so in case you want to give it another try, here's how I do it (I learned it in actual Japan):

1 egg
1 cup of white flour (can be a little less)
1 cup of ice water (ICE water)

It is important to use really cold water. I can't stress this enough. In a bowl, beat the egg a little, then add the water, mix, and add the flour. The easiest way is to put the flour into a sieve and just keep lightly mixing the batter while you sieve it through. Do not mix too much. Should not be very thick, actually more liquid than ketchup.
Maybe you've only been using it wrong, because the way you use this is you put it next to the pan with the hot oil, dip in your prawns or what have you and immediately throw them into the oil, getting dripping batter all over the place. If you wait for the batter to stop dripping, you wait until it is completely gone. You can fish out the fried drops of batter afterwards and use them for delicious croutons.
And yes, it is important that your foodstuffs are dry before you dip them in. Otherwise, the batter will come right off.

Now for another good one. I use it to make zucchini or eggplant in batter, but you can use it for a lot of other things.

1 cup flour
~ 2/3 cup water
1 teaspoon turmeric powder
salt and pepper to taste

This will give you a much thicker batter. The turmeric powder not only gives it a glorious yellow color, but it also makes it fry better for some reason.

In exchange, I demand the Yorkshire pudding recipe.
Logged

Don't discriminate, you retards, racism is gay
Wibblewobble
Pug Club President


May contain nuts


View Profile
« Reply #4 on: May 17, 2010, 04:57 pm »

Hmm, I guess my water ain't been cold enough, or my prawns/veggies dry enough.

I will make your tempura (or the turmeric variation, I LOVE the earthiness of turmeric) batter tomorrow.

In return, the day after I will make Yorkshire Pudding, complete with pictures.
Logged

Wibblewobble
Pug Club President


May contain nuts


View Profile
« Reply #5 on: May 18, 2010, 03:01 pm »

The tempura turned out excellent. Tasty, not at all floury-fried egg.

I took your advice about cold water on board, and an hour before cooking I put a bottle of water (and a mixing bowl) in the freezer. It definitely helps, as the cold batter/hot oil is what makes it light and bubbly.

I scaled down the quantities to about a third of yours, as I was only making about a dozen bite-sized bits of fried stuff.

I also lightly dredged the prawns and peppers in a little flour before I dunked them in the batter, to help dry them and hold the mix. It seemed to work.

The downside: it's about the messiest thing I've ever cooked. I need to hire a skivvy.

Tomorrow: Yorkshire Pudding! (or possibly Toad in the Hole!)
Logged

norumaru
Columns: 2, Pillars: 4,
Posts: 5



View Profile
« Reply #6 on: May 18, 2010, 04:13 pm »

That's great! Glad to have helped, and looking forward to the puddings.

What we did where I worked was we'd heat about 8 liters of oil in a wok and put the bowl of batter next to it, halfway under the rim, so that pretty much all of the drippings landed in the oil (and in various soups, subsequently). That is hugely unpractical for a normal household that doesn't do this often and has no oil filter, though. You can somewhat reduce the splattering if you cover your way from the bowl to the oil with kitchen paper, and if you do it a few times, you will find out how to dip and turn the things to minimize dripping.

No matter what you do, though, it will always be kind of messy.

Oh, and try banana tempura with honey instead of soy sauce.

If you want to go for the authentic Japanese dipping sauce, use half soy sauce/half dashi. Yes, it is very liquid.

A special kind of tempura is kaki-age. For this, you mix onion cut into strips, thin carrot sicks or strips, some small shrimp, some strips of squid and whatever other vegetables you have lying around, all in thin strips (potato, lotus and burdock root are great) in a bowl, pour some batter over them and use a spatula or big spoon to fry up burger-sized, loose fritters. These are eaten with the same dipping sauce, but with added finely-grated daikon radish and great enjoyment.

Other great things to tempura: Purple yam (my favourite), eggplant, okra, broad strips of squid (no tentacles), lotus root, and pumpkin (the small ones where you can eat the skin).
But the king of tempuration is Hasami-age, wherein you blend a few shrimp and some surimi, mix it with some finely-chopped leek and garlic and a dash of soy sauce, and sandwich this mix between two slices of lotus root. This is then dipped and fried. It is an ass-load of work, what with peeling the shrimp, but if you have guests or time it is well worth it.

OK guys I give up. I'm gonna start cooking more Nip food starting tomorrow, and posting recipes with pictures. I'm risking ruining my laptop by drooling into the keyboard, here.
Logged

Don't discriminate, you retards, racism is gay
BSam
Vice Douchelord



View Profile
« Reply #7 on: May 18, 2010, 05:30 pm »

Tomorrow: Yorkshire Pudding! (or possibly Toad in the Hole!)

Toad in the hole is the best thing.

Looking forward to it!
Logged
Alderaan
I love purple!
Nevermind, Just Another Jerk


Suuuuucks at avatars.


View Profile
« Reply #8 on: May 18, 2010, 05:36 pm »

I would love to see that Yorkshire pudding recipe.
Logged
Wibblewobble
Pug Club President


May contain nuts


View Profile
« Reply #9 on: May 19, 2010, 04:18 pm »

Wibblewobble's Mighty Fine Yet Simple Yorkshire Pudding Recipe

I don't usually measure quantities, I just bung enough in until I think 'that's about right', but for this I weighed the bowl after each bung, and worked it out:

Ingredients

125 g (half cup) plain flour
125 ml (half cup) milk
1 egg
Salt & Pepper to taste.

Firstly, preheat your oven to a little under 200oC (about 400oF).

You must have a container! This is a battle-scarred six cup muffin tray:



Put a little drop of cooking oil in each cup, and put it in the oven to get hot.

Put your flour, egg, and a LITTLE of the milk in a mixing bowl:



Start mixing with a spoon. By putting only a splosh of milk in at first, it's far easier to get rid of the lumps in the thickish paste you're mixing.

When your thick batter is de-lumperated, slowly incorporate the rest of the milk, mixing all the time, until you've got a medium batter, thick enough to coat a spoon:



Add salt & pepper to your taste, and put the mix in the fridge to rest for about 10 minutes, whilst your tray heats up in the oven and you go and have a beer.

Take the bowl out of the fridge and give it a final stir.

Take the hot tray out of the oven, and spoon the mixture into each cup. It'll sizzle a bit in the oil (which is good, as it means the puds won't stick when you take them out). It should work out as about two tablespoonfuls for each cup:



Then put the tray back in the oven for about 35-40 minutes.

Go have another beer. Maybe two.

Forty minutes later:



Success!

What do they taste like, and what the hell do you use them for?

They're a bit savoury, but with nice crunchy texture.

In the UK you serve them with a roast dinner, where they sop up the meaty gravy juices.

They freeze fantastically well. Just take one out of the freezer bag and bung it in the roasting tray with your meat and vegetables for the last 10 minutes of cooking, and you're good to go.



Logged

Captain Bravo
Captain Obvious


Mercenary Prostitute


View Profile
« Reply #10 on: May 19, 2010, 04:38 pm »

So, wait, Yorkshire pudding is actually more like a dinner roll? You English are weird.

(I'm still going to try it.)
Logged
Wibblewobble
Pug Club President


May contain nuts


View Profile
« Reply #11 on: May 19, 2010, 04:53 pm »

I had no idea what to compare them with in yankee cuisine, but yes, they're savoury; you wouldn't want one covered in banana custard.
Logged

Captain Bravo
Captain Obvious


Mercenary Prostitute


View Profile
« Reply #12 on: May 19, 2010, 05:52 pm »

After making a batch and trying one, I'm a little dumbfounded. I don't really have any frame of reference to compare these to. They're very, very good, but they're savory. It's like a light, fluffy pastry, but decidedly un-dessert-like. Still, this recipe is a keeper, thanks Wibble!
Logged
Wibblewobble
Pug Club President


May contain nuts


View Profile
« Reply #13 on: May 19, 2010, 06:23 pm »

They're very, very good, but they're savory. It's like a light, fluffy pastry, but decidedly un-dessert-like.

You've created the acme of Yorkshire Pudding on your very first try!

Outstanding!

Wibblewobble: Converting the non-English, one heathen at a time.
Logged

The Iron Colonel
Nevermind, Just Another Jerk



View Profile
« Reply #14 on: May 19, 2010, 06:26 pm »

I'm not an Englishman, but I was under the impression that Yorkshire pudding had suet (or some beefy byproduct) as shortening. I see no shortening in your recipe at all, though, so I believe I am misinformed. Is there some kind of bready goodness from the UK that uses suet?
Logged
Wibblewobble
Pug Club President


May contain nuts


View Profile
« Reply #15 on: May 19, 2010, 07:12 pm »

Ahhh I see; you're thinking of things like Steak & Kidney pudding (savoury), or Spotted Dick (dessert).

Those are suet puddings. The bowl in which they're constructed is wrapped in muslin, then lowered into a pot of simmering water and cooked for about a million hours.

I've never gone to the trouble of making one, it's the sort of thing your grandma would make.

It's old fashioned and stodgy, but extremely and deliciously satisfying in a 'comfort food' sort of way.

Here's wiki:

Steak & Kidney Pudding

Spotted Dick
Logged

Fiction
I'M GONE STING
Posthulhu



View Profile
« Reply #16 on: May 19, 2010, 08:08 pm »




They are small, crunchy, and bitter. They're a little burned too, but not to the point of being inedible. What did I do wrong, probably?
Logged
Fiction
I'M GONE STING
Posthulhu



View Profile
« Reply #17 on: May 19, 2010, 08:13 pm »

Err...

Logged
oball
Mod



View Profile
« Reply #18 on: May 19, 2010, 08:29 pm »

I'm not an Englishman, but I was under the impression that Yorkshire pudding had suet (or some beefy byproduct) as shortening.

Traditionally you cook Yorkshire pudding in a tray underneath your roasting chunk of meat, so that the fat drips onto it, which may be what you were thinking of.
Logged

BUTTS FOR THE BUTT GOD
The Iron Colonel
Nevermind, Just Another Jerk



View Profile
« Reply #19 on: May 19, 2010, 09:02 pm »

Both of those sound plausible. I've not given the subject much thought, I just recalled something about beef. Either way, it sounds delicious.
Logged
Pages: [1] 2 Print 
Jump to:  


Login with username, password and session length

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!