Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?
May 30, 2017, 02:16 am

Updated Topics | Recent Unread Topics
Home Help Search Login Register

+  Dragon Mountain
|-+  Forum
| |-+  Science! and Sports
| | |-+  Ask your dumb Science questions here, you idiot
Pages: 1 [2] 3 4 5 Print
Author Topic: Ask your dumb Science questions here, you idiot  (Read 30266 times)
thermus aquaticus
Still Owes Me Five Bucks



View Profile
« Reply #20 on: September 25, 2012, 06:56 pm »

Unless you're starting with ice water, the salt won't help anything. It'll just take longer to for the freezer to cool it down because there's a bunch of water around the drinks.
Logged

Wooer et ass, 2013
RummyLu
The PUNisher
Probably a postbot



View Profile
« Reply #21 on: September 28, 2012, 07:54 am »

I have been really really sick this week, and because of public holidays my doctor was incommunicado. Also, because a bunch of fuckwits decided to sell mass amounts of poisonous bootleg hard liquor there was a nation wide ban on selling spirits (now lifted, but fuck those guys anyway because now I finally have antibiotics.)

Basically this meant I was desperate for some form of relief but I couldn't make ye olde home remedy for coughing of a hot toddy.

Anyway, I googled around and tried hot milk and honey. It has consistently knocked me out like a glorious opioid sledgehammer for the better part of the past week. I'd like to know how it did this? The internet is divided and tells me that it's mostly psychological but although I was breastfed as a baby, I've never used warm milk as a sleeping aid in my life before this.
Logged

"Iíll retract the rape complaint from the wombat, because heís pulled out."
spermus
Still Owes Me Five Bucks



View Profile
« Reply #22 on: September 28, 2012, 04:11 pm »

There's a lot of sugar and fat in milk and honey. That might be dehydrating you, and dehydration makes people sleepy. That's the only physical cause I can think of. Why not just go with the psychological explanation? It sounds good to me.
Logged

That was not the bear I was expecting in a gay blowjob.
HyperGlavin
bridge and tunnel dyke
Probably a postbot


I'm a cool guy irl


View Profile
« Reply #23 on: September 29, 2012, 02:01 am »

I'm just spit-balling here, but it could also be because your body is already exhausted from fighting illness and that any relief from your symptoms may allow it to get some rest.
Logged

Yes, come on, get a dog up you, you rapscallion.
RummyLu
The PUNisher
Probably a postbot



View Profile
« Reply #24 on: September 29, 2012, 03:12 am »

Actually, that's a fair point Glavin I'd not thought of it like that.

I don't discount the psychological reason, I was just very surprised that it worked so well. I was more inclined to believe it was wicked cow and devil bee magic.
Logged

"Iíll retract the rape complaint from the wombat, because heís pulled out."
norumaru
Columns: 2, Pillars: 4,
Posts: 5



View Profile
« Reply #25 on: September 29, 2012, 07:27 am »

As an aside, as relieving as milk may be for a cold, it is ultimately prolonging the soreness of your throat. Milk clings to the insides of your throat and forms a coat that soothes the symptoms for the moment, but at the same time provides a great culture medium for the bacteria causing them.

Honey, however, is antiseptic and also film-forming. I always go for ginger tea with lots of honey, and my doctor says that is a good choice. Some chili in it can also help, because it makes the throat hot, thus killing bacteria the way a fever does.
Logged

Don't discriminate, you retards, racism is gay
MadPiper6
Hyperbolic Paraboloid



View Profile
« Reply #26 on: December 03, 2012, 03:33 pm »

OK this one's extra dumb but it hurts my brain: What the fuck is light? (this question started off as "why can't anything go the speed of light" but the new version of the question seems to most aptly illustrate my confusion re: light)
Logged
thermus aquaticus
Still Owes Me Five Bucks



View Profile
« Reply #27 on: December 03, 2012, 05:40 pm »

I checked Wikipedia and boy, it's hard to know where to start. It's not a dumb question because physicists don't know either.

You probably know it's made of photons, which act like particles in some ways, but waves in others. All particles are like this, actually. Any particle's frequency is proportional to its momentum. All objects are like this, too. Baseballs and planets have their own frequency, based on their mass and speed. Photons travel a lot, and they have low momentum, so their frequency is measurable and their wave nature is apparent.

They act like particles in that they fly out of things and hit other things. And they have momentum.

They act like waves in that they're like expanding disturbances in a medium, that medium being the electromagnetic field. In particular, they experience refraction and diffraction.

Refraction is when a wave's speed changes as it travels into a different material, which tends to change its shape as well. You might think it's light's particle nature that allows you to see images, but it's actually the wave nature. A lens refracts light just right, so that an expanding wave flips into a temporarily shrinking wave, so that its energy converges on a teeny little point on your retina.

Diffraction is a form of interference. Let's see, you need to know what a wave function is, for that. A basic wave function is, a function of a wave. Like f = sin(x) or g = cos(x). Interference is what happens when two or more waves meet. You simply add the wave functions. If f and g met, the resulting wave would be sin(x)+cos(x). Diffraction is a kind of two- or three-dimensional interference that's useful in experiments and compact discs, as far as I know. It's important in the whole history (and present) of wave/particle research.

Light is something for which our old concepts of particles and waves are inadequate to fully explain. That might be why some people prefer to call photons "energy packets". That doesn't solve everything, though, because photons aren't packets either. And they don't have flavor, like quarks. Come to think of it, do quarks have flavor packets?

The 3D wave function of any particle, as it turns out, gives you the probability that the particle will exist at any particular point. Whenever the particle is detected, its wave function "collapses," and then it totally exists at the point where it was detected. What exactly that means, I don't know, and neither does science. It has more leads than I do, though.
Logged

Wooer et ass, 2013
thermus aquaticus
Still Owes Me Five Bucks



View Profile
« Reply #28 on: December 03, 2012, 05:58 pm »

Here's photons in the context of the particle world. They're on the upper right, under "BOSONS". You could think of this Standard Model chart as being one layer more basic than the periodic table.

And here's a good illustration in the wave context. A moving electric charge produces a perpendicular magnetic force. And vibrating electric charges are where we get most of our photons.
Logged

Wooer et ass, 2013
thermus aquaticus
Still Owes Me Five Bucks



View Profile
« Reply #29 on: December 03, 2012, 06:00 pm »

That second link should have been this:

http://www.astronomynotes.com/light/s3.htm
Logged

Wooer et ass, 2013
MadPiper6
Hyperbolic Paraboloid



View Profile
« Reply #30 on: December 07, 2012, 11:14 am »

Very cool. Thanks.
Logged
MadPiper6
Hyperbolic Paraboloid



View Profile
« Reply #31 on: December 07, 2012, 11:15 am »

I was going to say "illuminating!" and feel very clever but I have more reading to do before I can claim anything like that.
Logged
RummyLu
The PUNisher
Probably a postbot



View Profile
« Reply #32 on: March 01, 2013, 05:03 pm »

I have been prescribed a super strong course of augmentin antibiotics (amoxicillin/clavulunate potassium) to hopefully finally kill a sinus infection that has been giving me hell. Unfortunately, the massive dose gives me side effects that make me nostalgic for the days of just being sick.

Anyway, I understand why antibiotics can give you stomach upsets, but can anyone tell me how augmentin causes headaches? I have read that headaches are a reported side effect and oh god I am experiencing it for myself, but I'd like to know the mechanics behind it.
Logged

"Iíll retract the rape complaint from the wombat, because heís pulled out."
RummyLu
The PUNisher
Probably a postbot



View Profile
« Reply #33 on: April 30, 2013, 11:54 am »

FINE I DIDN'T WANT TO KNOW ANYWAY.


But I am wondering about this:

Cosmetic companies are suddenly telling me that I should be using a serum as well as a moisturizing cream for my rapidly desiccating skin. I know that pretty much 99% of what these companies tell me is utter bullshit, but is there really any difference in the "molecular size" of the two that would have a better effect on stopping me shriveling over time?
Logged

"Iíll retract the rape complaint from the wombat, because heís pulled out."
Karlski
ಠ_ಠ
Admin



View Profile
« Reply #34 on: April 30, 2013, 05:22 pm »

No
Logged

<TDF> Karlski only has one rule
<TDF> And that rule is "get fucked"
HyperGlavin
bridge and tunnel dyke
Probably a postbot


I'm a cool guy irl


View Profile
« Reply #35 on: April 30, 2013, 10:49 pm »

www.stuffiputonmyself.com/2012/08/magic-isnt-real.html?m=1
Logged

Yes, come on, get a dog up you, you rapscallion.
RummyLu
The PUNisher
Probably a postbot



View Profile
« Reply #36 on: May 01, 2013, 01:11 am »

Ah well, thanks guys!
Logged

"Iíll retract the rape complaint from the wombat, because heís pulled out."
Metsfan
Book Smart


I like to get intimate with inanimate inmates.


View Profile WWW
« Reply #37 on: July 03, 2013, 10:16 am »

Is there a mathematical proof to describe how smoke billows upward?
Logged

Won't somebody think of the nerds?
barco
Buddy Friend Pal


Life is a difficult process


View Profile
« Reply #38 on: July 03, 2013, 10:32 am »

The Navier-Stokes equations for turbulent flow will do that for you, but generally turbulent flow equations are hard as fuck, and can't be solved exactly
Logged

Anger at the Boner Funeral
Johnny Roastbeef
Novice LARPer



View Profile
« Reply #39 on: July 03, 2013, 10:42 am »

The Navier-Stokes equations describe the flow of any fluid under a pressure gradient and would most likely be turbulent in the case of smoke, like barco suggested.  In their basic form though, those don't give you the buoyancy effects that would be needed to model smoke.

Smoke is really a natural convection problem (also called free, or unforced convection), coupled with fluid mechanics. There's lots of ways that you could model or approach that problem mathematically, but the most practical one involves numerical solutions through CFD.

These guys did a DNS model, which means they model all scales of the turbulence, which pretty much is on the cutting edge with respect to the limits of modern supercomputers.  Usually to do CFD you would apply some kind of simplification where you only model the larger scales of turbulence and make an assumption about how things behave on a smaller level than that.

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5ApSJe4FaLI" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5ApSJe4FaLI</a>
Logged

Because freshness is expected of any hip-hop artist, I avoid using traditional techniques.
Pages: 1 [2] 3 4 5 Print 
Jump to:  


Login with username, password and session length

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!